fashiondailymag

I love breakfast parfaits: Chia seed pudding parfait with Blueberry Strawberry Banana Smoothie, Kiwi, Blueberries, Mango and Watermelon

It began with one of my most beautiful breakfasts to date, the oatmeal parfait, and the obsession intensified with my perfect smoothie parfait. But this is a parfait of all the nutrients, flavours and colors I could ever need in my life, and is definitely going to be a recurring thing - Chia seed pudding and “boring” won’t be put in the same sentance again! 

I love breakfast parfaits: Chia seed pudding parfait with Blueberry Strawberry Banana Smoothie, Kiwi, Blueberries, Mango and Watermelon

It began with one of my most beautiful breakfasts to date, the oatmeal parfait, and the obsession intensified with my perfect smoothie parfait. But this is a parfait of all the nutrients, flavours and colors I could ever need in my life, and is definitely going to be a recurring thing - Chia seed pudding and “boring” won’t be put in the same sentance again! 

npr
skunkbear:

Where do plastic bottle caps go? A lot of them end up in the ocean. 75% of ocean debris is made of plastic. And it doesn’t just float around. A lot of it ends up killing marine life, like this young albatross.
We talked with marine biology professor Richard Thompson yesterday, and he said:

It’s not about banning plastics. It’s about thinking about the ways that we deal with plastics at the end of their lifetime to make sure that we capture the resource.

On Midway Island, where this photo was taken, 1/3 of albatross chicks die from ingesting plastic. This image comes from photographer Chris Jordan, who says:

For me kneeling over their carcasses is like looking into a macabre mirror. These birds reflect back an appallingly emblematic result of the collective trance of our consumerism and runaway industrial growth.

Jordan directed a film about Midway Island and you can explore more of his pictures here.

skunkbear:

Where do plastic bottle caps go? A lot of them end up in the ocean. 75% of ocean debris is made of plastic. And it doesn’t just float around. A lot of it ends up killing marine life, like this young albatross.

We talked with marine biology professor Richard Thompson yesterday, and he said:

It’s not about banning plastics. It’s about thinking about the ways that we deal with plastics at the end of their lifetime to make sure that we capture the resource.

On Midway Island, where this photo was taken, 1/3 of albatross chicks die from ingesting plastic. This image comes from photographer Chris Jordan, who says:

For me kneeling over their carcasses is like looking into a macabre mirror. These birds reflect back an appallingly emblematic result of the collective trance of our consumerism and runaway industrial growth.

Jordan directed a film about Midway Island and you can explore more of his pictures here.

npr

livelymorgue:

Jan. 22, 1958: New York’s famous skyline was greatly reduced by fog that was part of a storm that disrupted air, sea and automobile traffic, brought the city’s reservoirs to 85 percent capacity and flooded Westchester basements. The Times reported that flights were rerouted, a boat ran aground, a motorist was killed and there was snow in the Midwest. Photo: Arthur Brower/The New York Times